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HR Scorecard Template

Today’s HR executive is being challenged to do more as a strategic partner. One of your best tools is the HR Scorecard. It can take many formats including graphs, tables, Powerpoints, timelines, etc. Let’s discuss how to measure what matters and what to do with the data and information obtained.

  1. Measure what matters. For example, if an objective is to reduce the cost of hire, why is that important? Do you intend to do a lot of hiring in the next 12 months? If not, why bother measuring the data? Strategic HR executives always ask how the data they are analyzing ties to the vision, mission, values, goals, and strategic objectives for the company and their department.
  2. Rank it against other objectives. Is perfecting your cost of hire as important as retaining your existing employees? For example, if you intend to hire 50 employees and reduce the cost per hire by $1,000 each, that’s a savings of $50,000. However, if you lose two well-trained employees, the replacement costs would easily dwarf the cost of savings per hire. Therefore, we want to prioritize our objectives so we work in our highest and best use. That’s optimization of HR as a resource.

Read the rest of this extensive report… full PDF here.

If Your Boss Was a Cooked Egg…

While at my sister’s house last week,  I found myself watching Family Feud. The question that was asked is: “If your boss was a cooked egg, how would you describe him or her.”

Here are the responses. Who wants to guess at what the last answer was?

Strategies for Developing a Career Path that Works

“The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle.” – Steve Jobs

“The things to do are the things that need doing, that you see need to be done, and that no one else seems to be doing.” – Buckminster Fuller

Maybe your job is not what you thought it would be, or you want to ratchet up, or you are burnt out, or something else seems more interesting…or you just got fired.

Consider these strategies to find a job you can love, even if it’s the one you are in:

  1. Nothing is wrong with you if you have not yet discovered your “passion” or “mission.” It can be as simple as “helping myself while I help others.” You can do that in any job.
  2. Nothing is wrong with changing jobs if:
    • There is no opportunity for creativity or growth.
    • You can’t earn more where you are at.
    • You want to work closer to home.
    • You dislike your co-workers, boss, or customers.
    • There is illegal or unethical activity going on.
    • This isn’t the third time you quit in the last two years.  If that’s the case, maybe you are the problem.
  3. Nothing is wrong with changing careers if:
    • The “story” of your career does not match up with the “reality” of your career.
    • You have grown far in that career and look to learn something new.
    • There is the possibility of working in a career that allows you to earn more or work in alignment with your passion, mission, etc.
    • You are financially set and want to do non-profit type work.
  4. Get out of the “grey zone” of uncertainty. Give yourself space and time to define your ideal career situation. Think both vertically and horizontally. For example, I’d like to be a lawyer for an environmental non-profit or I’d to be a games programmer at Electronic Arts.
  5. Interview people with your ideal career. Invite them to a coffee or lunch, or even offer to pay for their time.  Ask what they want and don’t like about their job.  Discover their story of how they came to be in this position.  Ask what they think the future holds for their career.  Last, ask what advice they would have for you.  I wish I had been smart enough to do this when I was younger.  Keep asking until somebody says yes.  It is worth the effort.
  6. Meet with a recruiter. Again, offer to pay for their time.  Ask for an evaluation of your resume, and what they believe your opportunities are and possible compensation levels.  Steps 4, 5, and 6 are all about gaining clarity.  Get facts before you make a career decision.
    • P.S.  See if they can run your resume through a resume screener to make sure you are using the right buzzwords. An example you can use yourself is https://www.jobscan.co/
  7. Don’t fear seeking part-time, temp or consulting work. Get your foot in the door and show them how amazing you are.  Do that, and they will want you as an employee.
  8. Don’t quit your day job until you have agreed to a new job. Then leave your company gracefully.  Provide them with two week’s notice.  Don’t bomb them on Glassdoor.  Don’t do a YouTube dance video. There is no good reason to create enemies.  Just move on.
  9. Get creative! Showing your resume online is not enough anymore.
    • Use your LinkedIn and Facebook contacts.
    • Use your alumni and school contacts.
    • Show up at industry association meetings.
    • See if your industry association has a hiring page, many do.
    • Knock on their door. This approach works best with smaller companies as you might get to meet the owner or president.
    • Network, but when you do, spend your time learning about them. See how you can help them.  That’s what gets people’s attention, not being needy.  Besides, needy is creepy.
    • Don’t forget the Yellow Pages.
  10. Know the companies that fit your career path. Many cities have a business publication that identifies the companies in your area. Then systematically figure out how you will approach them. Make your job! Send the owner an article you wrote or a blog post.  Mail it to them.  Offer to have a meeting to see how you can help them.  I have often got work by doing this.  “I’d like to meet with you for an hour to check your head and share what I know about ____.”
  11. Know yourself. Look for a career that fits you. Know your skills and motivators.  Take a few career assessments.  Take a few skill tests (see shl.com).  The better you know you, the more focus and confidence you will have.  One simple way to focus is to identify the five things you do best and circle the two things you enjoy doing best.  Find a job or career that focuses on those two things and you will find work nirvana.
  12. If you are out of a job, then make finding a job your whole priority. Make it a 5-day week, 40 hour-week job. Be relentless. Go all in!
  13. Keep learning. Lynda.com is a great resource for learning and free if you have LinkedIn premium (which you want if you are job hunting). Research companies, trends, challenges, etc.
  14. Create a week in the life for yourself. Three years from now, when you are doing work you love. What does a work week look like?  Spend a few hours noting this future with clarity and then bring that future into the present.  I have learned that you get what you ask for – just not when or how you would expect to get it.
  15. Be prepared. As the saying goes, success results from preparation meeting opportunity. Being prepared for an interview means researching the company website, news articles, LinkedIn profiles, Glassdoor reviews and more. Practice your interviewing skills with friends.  Interviewing is a sales job so know the questions you can be asked and how you would answer them.  Short and sweet answers are best. Also, be prepared with questions you may want to ask. Don’t ask questions you can find by researching Manta, Hoovers…or the company website. Consider questions such as:
    • Why is the position open? Did someone quit or get fired? Is it a new position?
    • How would you describe the company’s culture?
    • Where do you get your greatest satisfaction in working here?
    • What frustrates you working here?
    • What are the common attributes of your top performers?
    • What drives results for the company?
    • How does your performance appraisal system work?
    • What would you expect me to accomplish in the first 60 to 90 days?
    • In one year from today, how would you know if my hire was a success?
    • What training programs do you offer employees?
    • Do you publish career ladders for the position?
    • What percentage of managers are promoted versus recruited?
    • What is the most exciting thing happening at the company?
    • How often does the CEO meet with the management team?
    • What type of company social events do you have?
  16. Follow up, even if they don’t. Send a written thank you note and ask for the job.
  17. Last, don’t stress about the future even if you are in a financial squeeze. Cut expenses to the bone and focus on taking action in the present, the only real power you have.

Download the Career Strategies PDF

Resources:

https://www.livecareer.com/ -resume builder, job search, more.

http://jobboardreviews.com job board directory

http://www.jobhuntersbible.com  from Dick Bolles, author of What Color is My Parachute

https://www.shl.com/en/  a great place to test your skills

https://www.asktheheadhunter.com/- great advice on job hunting

https://www.careercloud.com– job hunting advice

https://www.job-hunt.org/– job hunting advice

https://www.forbes.com/video/4573540723001 video from Forbes on avoiding the resume black hole.

https://blog.linkedin.com/2016/10/06/now-you-can-privately-signal-to-recruiters-youre-open-to-new-job– as the URL suggests, how to use LinkedIn

https://www.donphin.com/tools/– last but not least, some tools I’ve created that can help

 

Investigation and Lie Detection

“The liar was the hottest to defend his veracity, the coward his courage, the ill-bred his gentlemanliness, and the cad his honor.” 
― Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

There is a great deal of literature available to help determine whether someone you are speaking with, perhaps during an investigation, or during a game of poker, is lying to you. What follows are some of the “tells” the trained eye will look for:

  • Eye contact avoidance.
  • Liars use less hands and arms. Often on their lap, folded, closed body posture.
  • Palms down on the table or clenched.
  • Arms and legs crossed.
  • Touching face, playing with hair.
  • Partial shrug.
  • Inconsistent words, gestures, and emotions.
  • What was the initial reaction?
  • Timing of gestures.
  • The surprise wears off quickly.
  • The tight smile; the small smile.
  • Head moves mechanically.
  • The guilty usually go on the defensive; the honest on the offensive.
  • The head shifts.
  • Slumped posture.
  • Liars generally won’t touch you or point fingers.
  • Liars feel the need to give a lot of details.
  • Liars often repeat the question to gain time.
  • Liars use your words.
  • The Freudian slip.
  • Discomfort with silence.
  • The guilty usually engage in body “awayness.” They will put up barriers.
  • Guilty people try too hard to convince. “I would never…”, “I wouldn’t lie,” “To tell you the truth…”
  • “I need time to think.”
  • They look to be relieved that the questioning is over.
  • Look for the out of left field response
  • They make an effort to change the subject.
  • The guilty will engage in moral superiority.
  • They will answer the question with a statement first.

When you are hot on the liar’s trail, you can say things like:

  • Let them know the advantages of coming clean.
  • On a scale of 1-10 where might you fit in …
  • What else could you have done?
  • Talk about it as if it is already an established fact.
  • Stare at them and be silent. Give them a reason to tell the truth.
  • Ask them if “this is the whole story?”
  • I know this happened… what I want to know is what your intentions were?
  • Was this an innocent mistake or a calculated effort?
  • Expand their statement.
  • I know there are two sides to every story…

Liars feast off of amateurs, which is one reason I don’t play poker, and a good reason for you to hire a pro when dealing with workplace investigations!

 

A Workplace Disability Accommodation Tool Kit from JAN

Managing disability accommodations can be a real challenge for both employer and employee. Of course, we want to do it gracefully, comply with the law and make sure the result is a productive employee.

My friends at the Job Accommodation Network have released an awesome Workplace Disability Accommodation Toolkit which includes:

  • Sample accommodation procedures
  • Training presentations
  • Role-play videos
  • Examples of policies and forms from leading U.S. businesses
  • Best practices for creating an inclusive workplace
  • Checklists to track the accommodation process

The Toolkit provides guidance for the different areas of the employment process and a resource for recruiters, hiring managers, supervisors, human resource professionals, accommodation consultants and allies of employees with disabilities.

Here’s an example of a resource page.

You can access the Workplace Accommodation Tool Kit https://AskJAN.org/toolkit

Why Every HR Problem Becomes a Sales Problem

Here’s a reality: half of your competitors hire better than the other half. Some are in the bottom 10%, and then there are those great companies in the top 10%. You can imagine how this variance impacts your bottom line, whether you have 5 or 5000 employees.

The same could be said for your retention practices. What if you had half the turnover of your closest competitor?

I speak with a lot of business owners. I do my best to help them understand there is a great opportunity in Great HR practices. I also let them know somebody must pay for poor HR practices and eventually that somebody is the sales team (which may be you).

There’s a lot of variance in the cost of that turnover depending on whether they were poor performers or great performers, took people with them, filed unemployment or work comp claims, etc.  To get a true sense of this exposure, I encourage you to fill in your “replacement” costs:

  1. The time and money it takes to find a replacement. Sourcing, interviewing, referral fees, etc. If you are a small shop and doing the hiring yourself that cost adds up quickly (What’s a few hours of your time worth?) __________________
  2. Time and cost of background checks and pre-hire fit for duty exams. (You do both…right?) Typically $75- $100 per new hire, if you do it right. ______________
  3. Short -term replacements costs such as paying for overtime, hiring a temporary employee or best of all, doing the job yourself. _______________________
  4. The cost of customer dissatisfaction (they lost a contact they liked and trust, or you lost the customer because of that employee they never want to see again) and loss of “brand value.” (What’s the “lifetime” value of a customer? What’s the value of your brand?) _________________________
  5. Training, onboarding, new hire paperwork, payroll, benefits, handbook, etc. _________________________
  6. A poor player affects team productivity. (How many people do they typically work with on a team?) ________________________
  7. Poor employees generate safety and work comp costs. (The most dangerous employee is a new employee. ) ____________________________
  8. It affects unemployment payments __________________
  9. It affects overall morale, reducing engagement and “discretionary” effort. (What % of total payroll costs is affected? If it causes even a 5% dent that’s a huge number. ) ____________________________
  10. It drives you crazy and that is… priceless!

Let’s say the turnover cost is conservatively $5,000 per rank and file worker. The ratio jumps dramatically higher with office personnel.  It is an expense that comes right out of ownership’s pocket. There’s no insurance for it, or any way to amortize the cost. Let’s say you lost three rank and file employees at $15/hr. and an office worker at $30/hr. That will cost you at least $75,000. To put that $75,000 back into ownership’s pocket, you must now produce a certain level of replacement revenue. Sometimes people are quick to think that’s an ROI figure, meaning if the company has a 10% ROI then it will cost $750,000 in revenue to place the $75,000 back into the pockets (bottom line).

Not so fast.

After speaking at two CPA conferences, I learned this was not the case. Because there are many fixed overheads involved, the replacement figure is closer to a 4:1 to 6:1 ratio. Meaning you must bring in top-line revenue of anywhere from $300,000 to $450,000 to put the $75,000 back into your pocket! And…that’s just so you can break-even!

Now that’s a much bigger problem!

It gets owners attention when they connect the dots and realize their personnel practices are not just creating cost problems but revenue problems too. That revenue can be broken down into the number of sales, customers, marketing efforts, engagements and other activities required to generate it. For example, if you’re earning $2,000-$4000 on each new contract sold you must sell at least 75-150 contracts to break even on losing those employees. What will you have to drive those additional sales?

I’ll say it again…getting your HR act together is one of the most underutilized opportunities at most companies, and most likely yours. Everything I hear from owners is about getting talent, getting talent, getting talent. Is your HR dept. (even if it’s somebody wearing three hats, like you) helping to attract great employees? Do you have robust referral programs? Is there great onboarding and engagement practices?

In future articles, I’ll drive further into best practices you can consider…but it all starts with knowing the math.

Whether you are an owner reading this, in HR, or simply interested, I will send you an Excel doc where you can help quantify your Turnover Costs and another spreadsheet to help you determine the most cost-effective Retention Programs to use.

Here’s to growing your bottom line!

Don

don@donphin.com

(619) 852-4580

www.donphin.com

www.linkedin.com/in/donphin

66 Powerful Strategies for Great HR

Great HR represents a competitive advantage for your company and career. It affects you whether you are in HR…or not. In the 66 POWERFUL STRATEGIES FOR GREAT HR e-book I discuss the reality that half of all HR managers are more effective than the other half. It’s also a fact the top 10% of HR managers get healthy six figure salaries and a seat at the strategic table.

Would you like me to show you how to break away from the pack and launch into the stratosphere of the top 10%?

Not only am I happy to share this e-book… but for the first 10 people who contact me, I will provide a free one hour coaching session. There is no cost for this and no obligation of any kind. You will love the experience.

I offer this free session because I’m excited about helping HR managers make a difference… and get paid well for it too! I know that if you find value in my help, you may also be interested in one of my programs.

Here’s what you do next. If you want to schedule a coaching session, all you have to do is email me at don@donphin.com and let me know your availability. Once I have your information, I’ll do some research on you and your company and we’ll set up the time for our meeting. I promise to get back to you within 2 business days.

Here’s to your success, Don

The Truth About HR and You

Whether you are in HR …or not…this book can greatly benefit your company. If I was an HR executive I would take it to heart. If I managed an HR executive you will learn how to do that better. I cover both the hard stuff like knowing your numbers and how to communicate them, as well as the soft stuff including the emotional challenges of most HR folks.

As I say in the book, the goal is to be a “Kick Ass” HR Executive. Do that and you will get the rewards and pay you desire.

Click here to get your free copy of the book today (you will get an immediate PDF download.)

Here’ to Kick Ass HR, Don

Ideas that Should be Retired in Human Resources

I love the Freakonomics podcast, especially a recent one on ideas that should be retired in science. http://freakonomics.com/2015/03/05/this-idea-must-die-a-new-freakonomics-radio-podcast/ Of course, this got me thinking about ideas that should be retired in HR. Here’s my shot at it:

1. Data will give us all the answers – In the podcast they discuss the fact that relying solely on data limits our ability to go deeper into relationships and understanding. Of course, data related to hiring or turnover or performance or compliance can be valuable, but it’s simply a starting point. So what if we find that most employees tend to leave our company at 2.8 years of employment. What meaning does that data have? To what extent have we had real conversations with people who have left the company at that time? Bottom line is not to rely solely on data because it seldom has all the answers and can remove us from common sense as well as deeper inquiry.

2. Performance appraisals actually improve performance. Dr. Deming began attacking this idea after World War II. He believed that performance evaluations were more destructive than beneficial of performance. Instead of performance appraisals he instituted kaizen, otherwise known as continuous improvement. He simply asked the question how can we do a better moving forward? What would it take for us to do a perfect job? Instead of performing to a tolerance (i.e. you’ve got to get at least three out of five on your performance evaluation) why don’t we ask how everybody can get fives?

3. HR needs to be strategic and get a seat at the table. I’ve had many conversations about what it means to be “strategic.” The problem is after a 15-year conversation about it, it’s a worn-out metaphor. So what if you don’t get a seat at a table, does that mean you’re somehow less effective? Perhaps you don’t even deserve or want a seat at the table. What’s really most important is whether or not you’re doing the HR job up to your full potential. That’s what really matters. Maybe we should substitute the term the full potential HR executive in place of the strategic HR executive.

What ideas do you think need retirement?

There’s Always Something Else Going On

If there’s one thing I know about your employees it is this: there is always something else going on. The workplace it not some vacuum void of external influences. After you watch this video (and you want to watch this video) think about your employees walking around like this and put these thoughts above their head:

I can’t believe she is going to leave me.

I can’t believe he cheated on me.

I feel exhausted and depressed.

My family hates me.

I hate my parents.

I can’t believe I have cancer.

My mother just passed away.

My kid is in the hospital.

My kid just got diagnosed with ADD.

I’m going to lose my house.

I can’t believe lost all my money in that investment.

I don’t know if it’s worth living anymore.

These are the endless loop conversations that nobody else hears and it affects the ability to listen, concentrate, produce, engage, or feel good about work. Heck, I’ve been there in my life.

This is about them…it’s not about you. And there is nothing you can do as an outsider to their conversation to “control” it.

When you have empathy for people you connect at the heart level. Your caring for them is as a person, not as an employee. Within boundaries you ask how you can help. The best thing you can do is go for a walk with them and just listen… or give them something positive to work on…or a few days off to get straightened out.

When the time is right you can have a dialogue with them. This is not a conversation or sharing of opinions. It is deeper conversation that gets to the essence of the problem. You don’t have to be a psychiatrist to be able to do it either.

Just the continued awareness that there is always something else going on will help to better empathize with employees…as well as yourself.

So let’s give everybody a break!

All the best, Don

 

PS want to bring check out the GreatHR Executive Program for yourself? Check it out: https://www.greathr.com/the-great-hr-executive-program/